Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

PET

Positron emission tomography involves the use of an imaging device (PET scanner) and a tiny amount of radiotracer that is injected into the patient’s bloodstream. A frequently used PET radiotracer is fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which the body treats like the simple sugar glucose. It usually takes between 30 and 60 minutes for the FDG distribution throughout the body to become fixed. PET-CT is a combination of PET and computed tomography (CT) that provides detail on both the anatomy and function of organs and tissues. This is accomplished by superimposing the precise location of abnormal metabolic activity (from PET) against the detailed anatomic image (from CT). This definition is reprinted with permission from the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

PET-CT

A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) that produces special views of the body. A combined PET-CT study is able to provide detail on both the anatomy and function of organs and tissues. This is accomplished by superimposing the precise localization of abnormal metabolic activity (from PET) against the detailed anatomic image (from CT). This definition is reprinted with permission from the Society of Nuclear Medicine.
 

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